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Financial mistakes to avoid when buying a house

 
 

Financial Mistakes to Avoid When Buying a House

 

1. Overspending

Chicago Real Estate

Before you even look at a single property, you need to know exactly how much you can afford. There are several online calculator tools you can use, but these tools are only estimates. Use these tools as a guide, but then adjust the amount based on your individual situation. How much is your current rent payment? Did you meet that payment each month with ease, or was it a bit of a struggle each month? The payment you can afford right now is a good indicator of what you'll be able to afford in your new home.

Meet with a lender and get pre-approved for an amount you can afford. Also, keep in mind that it's always better to lean towards a lower amount, rather than a higher amount. You do not have to use the entire amount you're pre-approved for. Once you know how much you have to work with, then and only then should you start your house hunt.

Source USA Today

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2. Don’t bust your budget

Shopping for houses can make you a little giddy. Look at this one! And this one! For a little bit more, you could get granite countertops, plus an office nook! You’re dealing with such large numbers when you’re browsing real estate that it might not seem like such a huge deal to stretch another $10,000 or $15,000 to get the home you really love. But that's not a game you want to play. “People look at the top end of their affordable monthly payment, and they don’t really think about what happens if their income goes down or they have to change jobs,”. (If you’re wondering what percent of your budget should go toward housing, check out the 50/20/30 Rule.)

What to do: Get preapproved for a mortgage. Not only will this prove that you’re serious to your realtor and to home sellers, but it will also give you an idea of your upper limit. “Remember that the lender is there to make you a loan, and the more money you borrow, the better it is for them,” Derrick says. “They want you to max out. I would take the pre-approval number and cut about 20% off.”

Source: Forbes.com 

 

3. Buying a New Car! 

Millions of new cars are sold each year, although few buyers can afford to pay for them in cash. However, the inability to pay cash for a new car means an inability to afford the car. After all, being able to afford the payment is not the same as being able to afford the car. Furthermore, by borrowing money to buy a car, the consumer pays interest on a depreciating asset, which amplifies the difference between the value of the car and the price paid for it. Worse yet, many people trade in their cars every two or three years, and lose money on every trade.

Sometimes a person has no choice but to take out a loan to buy a car, but how much does any consumer really need a large SUV? Such vehicles are expensive to buy, insure and fuel. Unless you tow a boat or trailer, or need an SUV to earn a living, is an eight-cylinder engine worth the extra cost of taking out a large loan?

If you need to buy a car and/or borrow money to do so, consider buying one that uses less gas and costs less to insure and maintain. Cars are expensive. You might need one, but if you're buying more car than you need, you're burning through money that could have been saved or used to pay off debt.

Source: Top 7 Most Common Financial Mistakes | Investopedia 

 

Mistake No. 7: Living Paycheck to Paycheck

In November 2016, the U.S. household savings rate was 5.5%, but other countries had considerably higher rates of personal savings. For example, France, Germany and Japan personal savings rates average around 10% or more, according to the latest data. Clearly it is possible to enjoy a high standard of living without financing it with debt.

The cumulative result of overspending puts people into a precarious position – one in which they need every dime they earn and one missed paycheck would be disastrous. This is not the position you want to find yourself in when an economic recession hits. If this happens, you'll have very few options. Everyone has a choice in how they live, so it's just a matter of making savings a priority.

 Source: Top 7 Most Common Financial Mistakes | Investopedia

 


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